Welcome to Philadelphia's 
Reading Terminal Market

parkingposter

News & Events

4th Annual Caribbean Day

Caribbean Day Banner

 

In celebration of National Caribbean- American Heritage Month, Reading Terminal Market will host its 4th annual Caribbean Day. The event will take place Saturday, June 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m at the Reading Terminal Market and feature traditional Caribbean food, drink, art and music.

The Market’s Caribbean Day will consist of fun activities from food demos to live music.  Food demonstrations will kick-off at 11:30 a.m. with Chef Careda Brown-Matthews, who will be whipping up tasty Jamaican eats like traditional jerk chicken, peas and rice, plantains, and cabbage.  The hour-long food demonstration will be followed with delicious libations provided by the “Bahama Papas”, mixologists Remy Duncombe and Chet Morley, who will be making virgin Bahama Mamas from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

In addition to the Caribbean food demo and drink demos, renowned Dominican artist Erick Picardo will display his artwork and conduct a live painting session in Center Court. Live music entertainment will be provided by Philadelphia natives Trinidelphia, performing their rhythmic steel pan music. There will also be a SOCA fitness demonstration, a roving performance from The Potcakes Junkanoo Band and more.

Guests will be treated to a host of Caribbean vendors including Taino Art, Afro-Caribbean/Latino Art, memorabilia and other Caribbean treats, as well as face painting throughout the day.  Caribbean Day is a program of the Caribbean Community in Philadelphia under the umbrella organization of UROC of Philadelphia. The Caribbean Community in Philadelphia is a project of CultureTrust Greater Philadelphia.

For more information and a full schedule of the day’s events, please visit https://www.facebook.com/events/274155829722426/

The Great Reading Terminal Market Easter Egg Hunt

Easter Egg Hunt FB PAGE 2017 02

 

On Saturday, April 15th hop on over to The Market because we'll be holding our first ever Easter Egg Hunt for ages 0 - 11 years old! The best news of all is that it's completely FREE! Bring your own baskets for this Market-wide Easter egg hunt. 

Meet in Piano Court (next to Miller's Twist & Metropolitan Bakery) to start the hunt.

9:30 - 10:00 : Ages 0-5, Egg hunt around The Market. These ages will be looking for yellow & green eggs.

9:45 - 10:00: Ages 6-11, Egg hunt around The Market. These ages will be looking for any egg that IS NOT yellow or green. 

10:00 - 10:30 : Storytime in the Book Nook (in Piano Court). All ages welcome.

10:30 - 11:30: Egg dyeing in City Kitchen. All ages welcome.

Special Guest: The Easter Bunny (9 am - 10:30)


Eggs will only be hidden in places accessible to the public. They will not be behind any merchant counters. 

See you there!

 

Market Open During Construction

OpenDuringConstruction 01 330x222

If you have been through the Market East neighborhood recently, you might have noticed that there is scaffolding on the 12th Street side of the Market (and a little on Arch Street and Filbert Street as well).  The convention center has begun the arduous process of replacing the roof from the Reading Terminal Headhouse on Market Street all the way to the Race Street side of the convention center (and include the Market's roof).  The target date of completion is November 2017.

The good news is that the Market will remain open as usual throughout the construction (all 10 sets of doors are still accessible).  So, please come shop and dine as usual!

 

the market blog

     
June 14 2017
There’s probably no other place in town where you can find more food experts than at Reading Terminal Market, and the Market’s expertise quotient went up another notch when Chef Tess Connors was hired to manage the Market’s City Kitchen demonstratio...
April 27 2017
We have put together a short guide that shares insider tips and services provided my the merchants of Reading Terminal Market that you may have not previously known exist. Did you know that you can purchase dry ice from Bassetts Ice Cream, ...
April 18 2017
When 12th Street Cantina opened in 1982, it was the first and only Mexican stand in Reading Terminal Market and also one of the first and only Mexican restaurants in the whole city.   At that time Mexican food was so rare in cheesesteak-land th...

Sign Up for Market News

Home

The Early Years

Reading Terminal Market opened its doors in 1892. The new Market was approximately 78,000 square feet and held nearly 800 spaces for merchants, each positioned in six foot stalls. The Market was laid out in a grid system similar to the streets of Philadelphia. There were twelve aisles and four avenues. It was the perfect location for easily receiving and shipping goods.

Soon after opening, the new state-of-the-art Reading Terminal Market would boast that its refrigeration facility was by far the biggest in Philadelphia with its half-million cubic feet of space and 52 separate rooms, each cooled to individual temperatures, 15 – 25 degrees for meat and poultry, 34 degrees for fruits and vegetables. The refrigeration system included an array of special pumps, compressors, and other equipment to handle the brine and ammonia used in its operation. When the cold-storage facility reached full stride a few years later, a visitor to its chilly climes would regularly find stored there 200,000 pounds of meat, 50,000 crates of eggs, thousands of cans of cream, 10,000 – 20,000 boxes of poultry, 10,000 barrels of berries and cherries, 25,000 barrels of apples, and 10,000 tons of ice.

In later years, business flourished as suburban housewives began to take advantage of another aspect of the railroad's involvement in the Market – a free market basket service on suburban trains. Under the system, the homeowner could arrange for her grocery order to be filled in the Market and the basket placed upon a train bound for her town and held at the station until she picked it up.

As horse-drawn wagons gave way to refrigerated trucks in the years after World War I, the Market was able to improve its earlier attempts at home delivery. The trucks provided service every hour to some 60 suburban towns and resorts along the New Jersey shore.

In November 1931 the Reading Terminal Market and the Merchants' Association jointly celebrated the Market's 40th anniversary with a week-long "Food and Home Progress Exposition," which drew tens of thousands of people from all over the region. A proud Reading president, Agnew T. Dice, bragged that the railroad's unique food emporium had won nationwide fame, touting that it was the biggest market in Pennsylvania, and the largest under one roof in the country.